Classic Children's Television Shows.

Jul. 26th, 2017 10:08 pm
shadowkat: (Default)
[personal profile] shadowkat
Why is it I'm wide awake and raring to go, now, but want to sleep between 6 -10 am, and 1-3PM?

Sinuses are bugging me a bit. I feel like I have a catch in my chest or some congestion. Probably combination of allergies and chemicals (paint and pesticides ie. Raid).

Off and on over the past few years, I've been discussing children's television programming with Doctor Who fans. Who keep telling me that Doctor Who is a treasured British children's series, and they didn't have much children's programming.

Culture shock. Television more so than movies depicts some of the cultural differences between our countries. For one thing when I visited France in the 1980s, I was surprised to see US series in French, same with Australia (they had US television shows, but not the new ones, reruns from five years ago). As did Wales and Britain. Actually, I found watching television during the summer in England and Wales to be a painful experience in the 1980s...not that I had reason to do it that often. Did see a lot of Fawlty Towers.

Anywho...I thought I'd skip down memory lane in regards to kids shows.

In the 1970s, I watched the following television shows as a child, near as I can remember. And my brother and I loved Saturday morning cartoons. We'd eagerly await the new cartoons...which premiered the third Saturday in September. They were on from 7 am to roughly 12 noon, on all the networks. We only had four networks and UHF back then. Prior to showing up on Saturday morning, the networks would air a preview of the upcoming series as a sort of advertisement on the Friday night before. So you could plan which ones to check out.

* Hong Kong Phooey -- sort of a take on Superman and Mighty Mouse. Except with a mild-mannered dog.
So imagine cartoon dogs playing all the roles in Superman.

* Sid and Marty Krofft's HR PufnStuf (aired from 1969 - 1971). I loved this show, but only vaguely remember it. (I was born in '67). A young boy named Jimmy has in his possession a magic flute named Freddie that can talk and play tunes on its own. One day he gets on a magic talking boat that promises to take him on an adventure. The boat happens to belong to a wicked witch named Witchiepoo, who uses the boat to kidnap Jimmy and take him to her home base on Living Island, where she hopes to steal Freddie for her own selfish needs. Fortunately Jimmy is rescued by the island's mayor, a six foot dragon named H.R. Pufnstuf, and his two deputies, Kling and Klang. Then his adventures begin as he attempts to get back home.

* Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids -- hosted by Bill Cosby (this was in the 1970s, when Cosby was still a cool guy, before all the allegations came out against him. And before you say anything about Cosby, keep in mind the same allegations came out about Trump -- actually they were worse, and people elected him President. Lando wouldn't let me hear the end of it. He's not wrong, we are a racist society. Sexist and racist. Just not bloody sure what I can do about it.) The show however was pretty good -- it was about a bunch of black kids in the inner city learning how to help each other and stand up to bullying and racism.

* Battle of the Planets (1978) - adored this cartoon

* The Muppet Show -- basically a light children's satire on variety shows and various cultural and political issues of the time, starring the Muppets.

* School House Rock - 1973 - 2009 (Schoolhouse Rock! is an American interstitial programming series of animated musical educational short films (and later, videos) that aired during the Saturday morning children's programming on the U.S. television network ABC. The topics covered included grammar, science, economics, history, mathematics, and civics.) -- this was the result of the Children's Television Act of 1969, which was updated in 1996.

* The Secret Lives of Waldo Kitty (which was an illegal adaptation of the Secret Lives of Walter Mitty starring cats and dogs...and got into trouble with James Thurber's estate, for well doing it without permission)

* Sesame Street (1969)

* The Brady Bunch (1960s, early 70s, mostly in reruns)

* The Monkeeys (1966 show, in reruns in the 70s)

* Batman (1966 -- in reruns in the 70s)

* The Addams Family

* The Archie Show (1968) -- became Archie Funnies in 1970s

* The Flintstones...

* The Jetsons

* Lost in Space - 1965 (A space colony family struggles to survive when a spy/accidental stowaway throws their ship hopelessly off course. This is basically the American version of Doctor Who.)

* The Pink Panther (1969) -- a cartoon based on the Blake Edwards films, except without the adult content.

* Tom & Jerry

* The Bugs Bunny and Road Runner Show

* The Hannah Barbara Hour

* Sid & Marty Krofft Super Show

* Free to be You and Me

* ABC Afterschool Specials

* Reading Rainbow

* Kimba - the White Lion (basically the story that Disney co-opted for The Lion King, except he didn't grow up and we just followed Kimba's adventures as he eluded his evil uncle, Scar.)

I googled and UK had kids shows.

See here: Classic Kids TV Shown in the UK in the 70s and 80s

We actually had some cross-over. But Tarzan the cartoon never to my knowledge aired in the US, nor did Book Tower, we had Reading Rainbow instead.

Wed Reading Meme

Jul. 26th, 2017 09:12 pm
shadowkat: (work/reading)
[personal profile] shadowkat
1. What I just finished reading...

Lord of the Fading Lands by CL Wilson -- this is an "epic romantic fantasy series" that sort of clobbers you with fairy tale and romance novel cliches. And spends fare too much time on setting things up, and not enough on character. Also it's extremely repetitious. By the halfway mark, I was slugging my way through it. Do not recommend.

Not sure I'll bother reading the sequel, even though I do own it. Unfortunately, I bought it before I realized I didn't like the writer's style.

Eh, for a more in depth review, here's what I wrote on Good Reads:

Read more... )


2. What I'm reading now?

Americanah by by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie - which is about two Nigerian former lovers. One, female, Ifelemu, who moves to America for two years, and then decides to return to Nigeria. The other , male, Obinz, who went to seek his forturn in Great Britain, and has returned to Nigeria, gotten married and has a daughter.

I'm currently in the section in which each is relating their past or what came before. How they lived in Nigeria, going to University there and school, and their families. Obinze's mother is a University Professor. And Ifelemu's mother is an administrator, while her father had a government job before he was summarily fired, for not calling his boss, Mummy.

The woman are exceedingly strong in this book. More so than the men. Which is interesting.

It's not a romance (Obinze is unhappily married), more a literary coming of age tale about what it is like being Nigerian in this world.

The British, Americans and the Northern Europeans, basically the entitled white people who attempted to colonize and raid Africa, do not come across well. I hate to say this but if you go around colonizing other countries, thrusting your imperialistic might, and enslaving or undermining their inhabitants...you are bound to be portrayed by the inhabitants of those countries as irredeemable entitled assholes many years later. *cough*Karma*cough*

It's a fascinating novel, but somewhat depressing. So not sure how long I'll be able to stick with it. It's over 600 pages. And small type in a paperback. My aging eyes prefer ebooks, where I can increase the print size. Otherwise I have to wear reading glasses over the contacts. Like I'm doing now as I'm typing this.

Compelling yes. Uplifting and funny, no.

I don't know why literary novels, for the most part, are so depressing. There are a few funny ones here and there. But most are these poetic dirges of middle-class malaise. Either bad marriages, unsatisfying romances gone sour, bad friendships, dysfunctional families, etc.

Almost as if the only way you can be considered worthy by the esteemed academic literary canon is if you are depressing. (Well as long as you do it poetically at any rate.) I actually saw people condemn a novel for having a happy ending. As if a prerequisite for quality is well not ending happily.

I have no interest in writing depressing novels. It's not that I can't do so...I can. But seriously, why? Life is hard enough at it is.

Hmmm...on a poetic front, are there any witty poets wandering about?
yhlee: Drop Ships from Race for the Galaxy (RTFG)
[personal profile] yhlee
"All the Colors You Thought Were Kings" by Arkady Martine [Shimmer]. Heart-stoppingly gorgeous space opera, stars as sharp as knives. I wish I wrote half so well.

This was exactly what I needed to read tonight.

Tomorrow there’ll be ceremonies and presentations, and then your nanite horde will be calibrated for shipside on live broadcast for the entire Fleet to see – another cohort of kids full up with starshine micromechanics, bound to service and obedience, gone off into the stars. You’ve been dreaming about it since you could read. You want it so much you’ve spent the last three months feeling like your chest is going to burn out from longing.

The night after tomorrow, though. You can’t let yourself dream about that.

Under the drape of your overjacket, snugged up to your spine like you’re its best lovecrush, are the disassembled pieces of a sniper rifle. Nestled right at the small of your back is the lead-shielded explosive heart of an electromagnetic pulse bomb.

(no subject)

Jul. 25th, 2017 09:27 pm
shadowkat: (Default)
[personal profile] shadowkat
1. Apparently Stephen Moffat doesn't think there was any negative fan backlash regarding the announcement of the New Doctor Who, and everyone was happy with the idea.

LMAO. This made me laugh for fifteen minutes. If you want to know why, eh, go find the numerous posts in which I discussed said backlash.

It's interesting, on a side note, I'm reading Americanha and in that novel, the female protagonist describes her mother as an individual who refuses to see the world as it is, only as she wishes it to be. This article reminded me a bit of that.

There is of course something to be said for doing that...to focus on the positive and ignore all negativity. Unfortunately my brain isn't wired that way.


2. Daniel Craig is stuck playing James Bond for a fifth time, after saying he'd rather die than play the role because the character is so misogynistic

He's not wrong.

The books actually aren't misogynistic. I read the books. They aren't like the movies at all. Nor is the character anything like the movies. There's less gadgetry for one thing. The only film that reminded of the books was Doctor No and Casino Royale. Everything else, nope, not like the books.

The movies however...have become increasingly misogynistic and unsettling. (Having seen all them, except for Spectra, I can say that with some credibility. I don't believe in critiquing things I have not read or seen. Or tried to read or watch.) That doesn't mean I didn't enjoy the films. Yes, I've enjoyed insanely misogynistic and sexist fare in my lifetime. (Points at Westerns and Noir films and books). I have a tendency to ignore it, also I like strong male leads in things. But, I'm also critical of them. And I tend to see them as representative of certain aspects of our culture...

That said? After 25 Bond films...and counting...

Time to cast a female Bond.

Just saying.


3. Midnight Texas -- it's not True Blood. It's sort of like a weak, third rate cousin to True Blood. Co-worker liked it. And it's likable I guess...just, I'm used to better fare. This feels like a B horror movie.

It's about this hipster guy (beard, twenty-something, skinny, fluffy hair) who is a psychic. Most of it is fake, except of course for his ability to commune with the dead. And the ghosts appear as beaten up corpses. They are fussy, nasty, and attempt to possess him. Anyhow, since he apparently owes money to someone nasty, he flees Dallas for Midnight, Texas. His dead grandma told him he'd be safe there.

Midnight, Texas is inhabited by supernatural freaks. There's an energy vampire (the most interesting character in the series), a witch, a talking tabby cat (which I found sort of funky), a female assassin who has an interesting co-dependent relationship with the energy vampire, a seemingly normal waitress with an over protective Daddy, and ...a pawn shop owner, who appears to have a few secrets of his own.

Unlike True Blood, the writing is no better than the books, which is not a good thing. The dialogue sort of falls flat. And the acting is rather awkward and stiff, making me wonder about the direction.

It just doesn't have the production value that True Blood did or for that matter Supernatural and Vampire Diaries. Heck, Buffy's production value was better.

I may continue watching it to see if it gets better. But I can't help but wonder what my co-worker was smoking.

Then again, I may be overly picky. I've been watching better fare lately.

Midnight, Texas

Jul. 25th, 2017 06:07 am
cactuswatcher: (Default)
[personal profile] cactuswatcher
It's been a while since I've watched anything on TV in prime time. NBC was advertising Midnight, Texas heavily during the news for a while. I glanced at a few reviews of the pilot yesterday and they were so bad, I thought it might be worth a look for giggles. For example, the review from Variety roughly said it had a hard time maintaining mediocrity.

Most of the reviewers had the advantage of being familiar with True Blood, the popularity of which apparently Midnight, Texas is trying to cash in on. Having never seen True Blood, I have to judge Midnight, Texas on its own.

Anyone who saw the first episode of Buffy, should remember how well Joss set background mood of the series before the first commercial. Midnight, Texas pretty much failed to set any kind of mood in an hour episode. I wouldn't say that the show was bad, mediocre or good. It was mostly inept. It was like watching an early rehearsal of a high school play version of somebody's first draft of a play. You don't want to criticize anything in particular, but it was certainly under-baked. No story to speak of. No sign of competent direction to guide the show toward anything. Lot's of characters running around seemingly at random. Lot's of stuff, but no focus.

The photography was fine. The acting seemed okay within the limits of the script. The special effects would have been state of the art in the 1940s. Not horrendous, just severely dated. The whole show was out of whack. To be bad, mediocre or good, something would have to be more in focus. It was supposed to be scary and have some humor, but the timing was so far off, I kept thinking, 'Oh, that was bland. Oh, what they said awhile back was supposed to be funny.'

The meager story had a sort of to-be-continued ending. But honestly I wonder if NBC will bother showing the second episode. I doubt anyone who saw the first will be watching.

Even the commercials were strangely inept. I guess NBC had a hard time selling ads. Most of them were a blur of early MTV-style choppy clips, none of which made any impression at all except for one trying to get people to visit Israel, for which the quick changes of scene made absolute sense. You know things are not encouraging for your new series when the best, most professional thing shown during the entire hour was an auto insurance commercial!

Grade: incomplete

The Machineries of Tarot

Jul. 25th, 2017 08:51 am
yhlee: wax seal (hxx Deuce of Gears)
[personal profile] yhlee
For your amusement, hexarchate Tarot readings (coding and spreads by [personal profile] telophase, card meanings by me):
No art right now, just meanings. The 78-card jeng-zai deck corresponds to the traditional Tarot but is specifically a hexarchate Tarot circa Kel Cheris' era. As such, upright sixes are all positive while upright sevens are negative, and the fours are lucky/unlucky.

This site is for entertainment purposes only: neither guarantees nor apologies are given for the accuracy or inaccuracy of any reading you may receive, and no responsibility is taken for any calendrical rot that may ensue. Hopefully you do not live in the hexarchate.

(no subject)

Jul. 24th, 2017 10:21 pm
shadowkat: (Default)
[personal profile] shadowkat
Difficult day, most of the days have been difficult of late...work feels like an unending obstacle course.

Tomorrow I'm coordinating and chairing/facilitating a site tour of an electric rail yard, with over fifty people attending. With any luck it will not rain.

I find the world tiring at times. Everybody thinks they are right, about everything. Too many spiders spinning their webs in the world, methinks, and not enough fireflies...

Scrolled through reading list, and got lost in the fluffy happiness and comfy escapism of the smartbitches book and film reviews...resulting in multiple book purchases at Amazon...all for $1.99-$2.99. One was about a woman with ausperger's syndrome who travels to Paris, France as a codebreaker to unlock a mysterious journal. It looked intriguing. And a few...just hit some of my story kinks rather hard. One was about a journalist who infilterates a BDSM club, and has to use an old lover as a means of entry. I rather love smartbitches...they are nice and fluffy...reading their entries feels a bit like looking at pictures of kittens.

I also joined a laughing yoga meetup group...now let's see if I actually get myself to go to it.
The concept of laughing yoga makes me smile.

Rather enjoyed a few postings on nature on reading list. Mai and peasant both did one. But, alas, I split ways on the whole spider bit. Luckily they didn't post pictures and just wrote about them. I have no issues reading about spiders. Actually, I do appreciate them on a certain level. As long as I do not have to see them, come into contact with them, or deal with them in any way. They can exist out there, away from me.

I'm afraid of spiders. Actually that is an understatement. I'm phobic. Downstairs neighbors in my old building liked to put a huge fake spider in the entry way, into the building. It looked real. I was convinced it would fall on my head and eat me. Irrational, I know, but phobia is an irrational fear of something. I used to have anxiety attacks just getting in and out of the building. Screamed when I first saw it.

And there was this time that I opened one of those huge chocolate Italian Easter eggs. I'd bought as a treat for myself. There was a spring-time gift inside. Silly me expected to find a flower or something. But no...it was a huge pink spider. You laugh. Go ahead. It's funny. But I had nightmares for weeks and threw it out, uneaten. Traumatized.

CW, a friend of mine, is also phobic.

CW: I don't know why I'm afraid of spiders.
Me: Oh I know why I am. It was reinforced by various and sundry sources over a lengthy period of time.

Read more... )


Off to bed. Hopefully to sleep. Long day ahead.

There and Back Again

Jul. 24th, 2017 06:46 pm
fresne: Circe (Default)
[personal profile] fresne
Just back from the annual pilgrimage to San Diego Comic Con. I have to say, taking a day to come down (and get home) is a great idea. The wings are put away. The Wonder Woman outfits are ready to be hand washed.

Read more... )

(no subject)

Jul. 23rd, 2017 09:08 pm
shadowkat: (Default)
[personal profile] shadowkat
Hmmm...note to self, just because you delete something, doesn't necessarily mean it disappears.

Although I do it a lot. Mainly because I'll re-read the comment or think about what I posted and go, frak. I did not mean to say THAT. I meant to say THIS. But someone will totally think THAT. What to do? DELETE! DELETE!

OR, damn, that didn't come out as well as I thought it did. Note to self, sugar warps the brain.

(no subject)

Jul. 23rd, 2017 08:31 pm
shadowkat: (Default)
[personal profile] shadowkat
1. The Great British Baking Show...this episode was pastry. And I felt sorry for the bakers.
Also, who makes Bakewell Tarts? I've rarely seen them and never had one. I've had marzipan tarts. But not with that horrid icing on top. Seriously. Everyone knows how to bake or should know how to bake a Bakewell tart? Maybe if you are British and in your 70s.

But I adore this show. And it made me cry this week...Val is such a lovely lady. She said she just bakes with love. And does it to share her love with others. And she's always so upbeat regardless of how well she does. Not that competitive and brings others up.

2. fannish about television -- alas, I'm not really. Nothing is really grabbing me. And the one show that did...got cancelled and didn't have enough episodes. Also...I think when you binge the entirety of a series at once, as opposed to watching it as it airs...the whole fannish bit melts away faster?

I've tried with Doctor Who. But it has so many problems. That said, it may turn around for me...I rather liked a good portion of this season. Much better than the previous season. And I did like the River Song arc. So, the change in Doctors or new Doctor may change my take on it and make it more interesting for me, while simultaneously getting rid of the things that irritated me about the series and kept me from investing in it on an emotional level. Don't know. This season was certainly better than last.

The trailer to the Christmas episode is quite brilliant.

3. Will -- uneven so far, but the play writing bits still fascinate. How Alice convinces him to adapt plays from books or borrow ideas from others, as opposed to coming up with his own. In a way his talent lay more in adaptation that in coming up with new and clever ideas. Also, love how it shows the collaborative nature of the work, and how much Alice influenced him and in a way co-wrote The Two Gentlemen of Verona.

4. Broadchurch -- the third season is better than the second, which I couldn't get into and found unwatchable. So far, I've found compelling despite the subject matter. What works is we have a normal, not beautiful, somewhat ordinary, older woman sexually assaulted. Usually in these shows, it's a pretty young girl, who is model pretty. Or a lead character. Here, it's a new character and I think that works better. Also they don't show the assault or fetish it, which helps. Too many shows fetish it.

Jodi Whittaker, who plays Beth Latimer in the series, I've been watching closely, curious to know what she'll do with Doctor Who. She seems a bit earnest. So don't know. But then that is the role of Beth Latimer. I can't remember her in Venus. I'm pretty certain I saw it, but the movie clearly wasn't memorable. I sort of wish Olivia Coleman had gotten the role. I rather like Coleman, she does world-weariness well.

I have to admit I can't understand half of what Tennant says. His accent is thick. And he mumbles. Same problem with a good portion of the actors. Latimer, I can at least understand. She enouciates and doesn't mumble. That was actually my difficulty with Tennant as Who, I couldn't understand half of what he said. He speaks fast and mumbles.

I keep putting on the close-captioning. In Broachurch, I rewind and sort of guess. Do however love what Tennant does with his face. Now if he'd just not mumble, it would be great.

5. It was either edit this post or write a new one...The Mary Sue keeps posting rather cool things to look forward to in the pop culture world. Such as

* Thor Rorganork, which has a great villain in Cate Blanchett's the Goddess of Death. Except I thought Doctor Strange was supposed to be in it. Don't see him in the trailer.
But the film looks like a lot of fun, with a buddy team up of Thor and Hulk.

*The Star Wars episode 8 trailer looks phenomenal.

* So too does the trailer for "The Gifted" which wonders what would it be like to be born a mutant in a world where the X-men and the Brotherhood may not even exist any longer? Focuses on lesser seen and known mutants such as Lorna Dane (Polaris), Thunderbird (John Proudstar, the Native American mutant), Eclispe, and Blink. Also stars Amy Acker and Stephen Moyer as humans.

* And..the Black Widow trailer. I didn't know they were doing a Black Widow film. It looks official not fan made.

* Apparently Marty McFly is coming back to save us from the Doofus in 2016-17. Will he succeed? Yes, there's a Back to the Future IV coming out. The mind boggles.

* They have actually adapted a film from one of my all time favorite children's books, A Wrinkle in Time -- which appears to have a good cast. And the trailer looks brilliant, unlike A Bridge Over Terribetha, which was a weak film.

* There's some concern over "The Defender's" which may focus a bit too much on Iron Fist, because of The Hand being the principle villain. I don't know about that...the Hand is actually also the main villain in Daredevil. I think Daredevil will be the center of it. Which is as it should be.

* They are apparently doing a film version of Cloak and Dagger, which I think are from the DC verse. Not sure about it.

* The Inhumans could be interesting...it's focusing on Medusa and Black Bolt, from the 1980s comics. Looks a little cheesy though.

Interesting, a lot of the comic adaptations and book adaptations, with a few exceptions, seem to be from the 1980s...which I rather love. Apparently my generation has some nostalgia for the 80s?

* Apparently Ben Affleck had a falling out with the new Batman director, so they are kicked Affleck to the curb...after that movie is done. Which..hmmm...how does that work with Justice League and other films in the franchise, exactly? Won't people notice a recast? Speculation is that Nightwing aka Dick Grayson will take over. Considering I liked Grayson in the comics and the 60s television series, I'm okay with that. Also he had a more interesting back story -- child of two acrobats, who were killed in a circus accident. So, a trained acrobat. Also, with Nightwing, you could potentially do a romance between him and Batgirl. (I've grown weary of Batman, finally. He's been over done. Superman has too, but not as badly as Batman.)

* And oh dear, I really need to catch up on The Expanse, don't I? They already have the third season trailer out.

DNA testing and grade school genetics

Jul. 23rd, 2017 07:55 am
cactuswatcher: (Default)
[personal profile] cactuswatcher
One of my most vivid memories is of a rest break in the middle of the Russian proficiency test which a dozen of us graduate students in the Slavic Department were taking to fulfill the language requirement for a masters degree. We all stood up to stretch our legs. I saw one of the women, who I admit I was very fond of, glance oddly around the room and then exclaim in a loud surprised voice to no one in particular, "I'm the only one in the room, who doesn't have blue eyes!" It seemed to be an odd thing to be interested in at that moment. I looked around quickly and saw a lot of worried looking young men and women, who even after the outburst were not paying much attention to eye color or anything but their own thoughts. The speaker obviously wasn't very worried about the section of the test we'd just taken, concentrating on everyone's eye color, and I guess I wasn't either, concentrating on her and her deep brown eyes.

One of the first things we learned about genetics in primary school was that blue eyes are inherited. We were told that you had to have two genes for blue eyes and thus both of a blue-eyed person's parents had to carry one gene for that trait. It made perfect sense in terms of my family. My father, my sister and brother, and I all had blue eyes. But my mother had hazel eyes, speckled and streaked with lots of different colors, blue, yellow, green, rusty brown. My father had two of the genes for blue eyes, and by chance all of us children inherited my mother's gene for blue eyes. No need for 'further study' as they say. Several years later I was in high school and trying to get the attention of a different young lady. I gave her something I'd written that included something I thought was a nice compliment about her brown eyes. Her first reaction? "I don't have brown eyes! I have hazel eyes!' Oops! In my defense, her eyes were indeed brown in color, a nice milk-chocolaty brown, not the deep brown most people think of with brown eyes. And hazel? Well, if she and my mother stood side by side, no one would ever say their eyes were at all the same color! So my estimation of what hazel eyes should look like and the girl's hazel eyes were wildly different. I was too embarrassed to be thinking about genetics at that moment, but clearly I should have noticed before then there is a lot more to eye color than blue eyes on, or blue eyes off.

Since my grade school days, science has learned that individual genes aren't the end all and be all of inherited traits. But that is so complicated that comparatively little of that has been discovered yet.

Which brings us to the subject of the popular DNA tests offered by a number of companies for a non-trivial fee. There is plenty of useful information one of these tests could give you: finding unknown relatives, telling you about risks for genetically transmitted diseases and so on. But one of the biggest selling points the companies give is mapping out your genetic origins: where 'your people' came from. This kind of analysis is a considerably less accurate than they would lead you to believe.

First of all we would *like* to believe that the populations from various places on earth are so distinct and separate that it is an easy task to tell ancestry from here from ancestry from there. (Especially if you happen to be a big time racist!) The simple fact is that statistically speaking compared to a lot of other mammal species there isn't a heck of a lot of difference between any humans genetically, African, native Australian, East Asian, European, or thorough mixture. So what the companies are working with is a very limited number of genes and gene sequences that seem to be characteristic of particular geographic locations. Now mitochondrial DNA can tell you very precisely which woman your mother's mother's mother's mother's mother's ad infinitum mother came from. Very interesting. But that is only an extremely tiny portion of your family history. If you are male, your Y chromosome can tell you similar things about you father's father's forefathers, but again only one direct line and if you are female (and don't have a close male blood relative handy who can be tested) you are out of luck on that score. Assuming an average of 25 years between generations, five hundred years ago each of us potentially had over a million individual ancestors. Compared to that, one or two easy-to-define direct hereditary lines are almost trivial.

So let's talk percentages. When you take a DNA test the company will tell you what percentage of your ancestors came from areas of the world x, y and z. This a not exactly a lie, but it is misleading. The one fact that is drummed into our heads when learning the absolute basics of genetics is that we inherit (y chromosomes with their direct X pairs excluded) exactly half our genes from our mothers and half from our fathers. No question, this is basically true. But in our minds we tend to think that by extension we must get exactly 1/4 of our genes from each grandparent, 1/8 from each great grand parent and so on. This is a very big mistake. From each parent we get half their genes from the pool of genes they got from their parents. Mathematically speaking, whether you are male or female, it is possible for you to inherit 100% of your mother's genes from her mother and none uniquely from her father. Statistically speaking that's very close to impossible, but technically it's not impossible. What you get from each parent is a random selection from their internal pool of genes, not a definable amount from each of your more distant ancestors. Since the vast majority of our genes as humans are so similar it generally isn't a big deal. But when you are looking at a much smaller selection of genes for this or that, it becomes much more important. Imagine that we are going to look at 100 genes from our personal DNA. We look back at our mother's parents' genes and can say that statistics show that most of us, around 68% of us, will get somewhere between 32 and 68 of these 100 genes from each. Around 26% of us will get between 5 and 32 from one parent and 68 to 95 from the other. Finally over 5%, one in 20 people, will get 5 or less from one of mother's parents and 95 or more from the other. So it is very possible that one of your parents' parent's gene sets (particularly in our small sample of genes) will show up in you much more prominently than each of those from the other three individuals!

What does this mean for those DNA test results? It means that they can only give you data on what you actually inherited, not on what your ancestors' DNA looked like. So suppose grandma told you a story that one of grandpa's grandmothers was a full blooded Choctaw Native American. Claiming Native American ancestry is more common than actually having Native American ancestry and having it is very difficult to prove through documentation. If your DNA test could be perfect and grandma was right, the test would hopefully tell you that you were at least 5% Native American by descent. But the number of genes they are testing for is small, and presumably in this case, the number of great-great grand parents who were Native American is one. So there is a fair chance that the test results will show 0% Native American ancestry even if grandma knew exactly what she was talking about!

If you want to take the test please do. It may tell you things you never knew. But don't take the ancestry results too literally. The tests can tell you a lot about who you are, but not as much about where you came from as you might hope.

(no subject)

Jul. 21st, 2017 11:38 pm
shadowkat: (Default)
[personal profile] shadowkat
1. And the FB debate on Carol's page continues...the poster who is cisgender, heterosexual, is offended because he sees it as a forced gender reassignment done by the writer. And refuses to ever watch the television show again because the Doctor is now being played by a woman.

the debate continues )
This is fascinating to me, because I honestly do not understand the backlash. Although I have seen it before in fandom. It's why, I've swung clear of fandom over the years. There's...to put it kindly, a kind of craziness that occurs in people when they get obsessed with something. And if they are shipping a character not the story, a specific character as they perceive and identify with that character in their heads...it can get heated.

That's the danger in shipping characters or relationships hard. Or being a devoted fan of a character, not a story or the world or all the characters within the narrative or the narrative itself, but a specific iconic character and/or relationship often at the expense of the canon or all logic.

I saw it in the Buffy fandom. A lot. A telling sign? I just want my television boyfriend to be happy.
(Ahem, the story ends when he is happy. There is no story. It's boring. We need conflict. This is not real life. This is a fictional story.)

2. On a funnier note... DALEKS ATTACK BRITISH TABLOIDS AFTER THEY POST NUDE PHOTOS OF NEW DOCTOR WHO...although I couldn't quite tell if the nude photo bit was fictional, if not, for shame you nasty people you.

3. our crazy ass government )

vid recs?

Jul. 21st, 2017 09:39 pm
yhlee: Sandman raven with eyeball (Sandman raven (credit: rilina))
[personal profile] yhlee
ETA: And if anyone knows where on earth I can find an Angel S4 AU vid to Will Smith's "Black Suits Comin'" I will be eternally grateful. (I can't remember the vidder, which is making this difficult to Google.) Also a Buffy/Angel shipper vid to Darren Hayes' "Insatiable," likewise apparently impossible to Google without the vidder's name.

I have gotten out of the habit of chasing down fan vids and would like to download some to my laptop for enjoyment purposes. I find them to be a lovely pick-me-up--they don't necessarily have to be cheerful vids. But I probably can't deal with extreme gore or realistic violence (I've seen half an extremely well done Hannibal vid that I had to nope out of because I am chicken).

Some vids already in my collection that I really like, to give you an idea (in no particular order):
- [personal profile] bironic's "Starships"
- bopradar's "I Kissed a Girl"
- Lithium Doll's "All These Things"
- [personal profile] laurashapiro's "Ing"
- [personal profile] giandujakiss's "A Charming Man"
- obsessive24's "Cuckoo" and "Remember the Name"
- [personal profile] shati's "Hope on Fire"
- sisabet's "Cowboy" and "Two Words"

Fandoms I especially like watching/or have some clue about:
- Buffyverse
- Firefly
- I like the visuals of Game of Thrones although I've only watched one episode (have read most of the extant books, though)
- Leverage
- Arrow
- The Good Place
- recent Star Wars
- The Great Queen Seondeok
- Suits
- The Good Wife

That being said, if the vid can be understood without having seen the show, I'm happy to watch it. :)

(no subject)

Jul. 20th, 2017 09:56 pm
shadowkat: (Default)
[personal profile] shadowkat
1. Note to self when you feel irritated and frustrated with life or anything, stay off the internet.

2. I've been thinking about something that I read in The Mary Sue, which also skips back to a discussion in a friends FB. It's about identifying as a gender. Or a better way of saying it -- identifying a character as "male" or "female", and that being an identifying characteristic that cannot be changed. I'm struggling to wrap my head around it. Because I wonder sometimes what traits we consider to be typically male or female.

Star Trek Deep Space Nine actually handled gender identity in an interesting manner. One of their aliens Jadzia Dax was symbiot. The symbiot jumped from body to body, merging with a new one and becoming reborn. The Captain of the Space Station, Benjamin Sisko had issues with Jadzia at first, because he'd known Dax as male in Dax's prior incarnation.


Jadzia Dax is a joined Trill. Though she appears to be a young woman, Jadzia lives in symbiosis with a wise and long-lived creature, known as a symbiont, named Dax. The two share a single, conscious mind, and her personality is a blending of the characteristics of both the host and the symbiont. As such, Jadzia has access to all the skills and memories of the symbiont's seven previous hosts. Jadzia holds academic degrees in exobiology, zoology, astrophysics and exoarchaeology, all of which she earned before being joined with the symbiont Dax. (DS9 Season 1 Episode Dax)

Jadzia Dax is the station's chief science officer, and is close friends with commander Benjamin Sisko and Bajoran first officer Kira Nerys. Later in the series, she becomes involved with the Klingon character Worf, and they marry during the sixth season of the show. Her character is killed by Gul Dukat during the sixth-season finale (due to Terry Farrell's desire to pursue a role on the then upcoming TV show Becker with Ted Danson). The character of Dax re-emerges in the seventh-season premiere in the form of Ezri Dax.




It's difficult to handle. Particularly when we are socialized to put a great deal of importance on gender roles. Everything in our culture impresses this upon us. It's ingrained in us as babies. Even down to clothing. My niece stated once that she was happy she was born a girl because she could wear skirts and dresses. Which struck me as interesting because I've met men who wore dresses in NYC. Even went contra-dancing with one of them. I wore pants, he was wearing a skirt. Her statement even more amusing when I consider that my brother refused to tell anyone the gender of his child prior to her birth, so they would not get her gender specific items. He wanted blue, not just pink or vice versa.

At work, I once discussed Mad Men with a male coworker, who felt Elizabeth Moss' character was too masculine. That she clearly wanted to wear the pants. And wasn't willing to be female. And wanted to be a man. (I had to take three steps back, swallow hard, and remember he's not aware he's being sexist here. And he's not sexist in other ways.)

Remember being on a fanboard when it was announced that Starbuck in BattleStar Galatica reboot was being recast as a woman. Fans of the previous series went nuts. Dirk Benedict who'd portrayed the role was deeply offended. (Sort of makes me rather proud of Colin Baker who portrayed Doctor Who and adores the idea of a female Who, of course Who is a bit different...in some respects, but still.).
One woman on the board went ballistic. She felt it was an insult. How dare they! The more people complained about it, and they did through the entire course of the series, the more excited the writers became. Starbuck was interesting to me, because in some respects Katee Sackoff played the character more masculine than Benedict, more tough. She was high adrenaline. A Boxer. Took Apollo down in the ring. An ace pilot. Smoked those cigars with glee. Took no prisoners. A complete subversion of gender stereotypes. The writers through the recast challenged viewers and their own concept of gender. And identity. It was a brilliant move, but also a risky one.

Years ago, I wrote a Fanged Four fic with various members of a board. And a fight broke out while writing the fic. One of the writers had come up with the idea of having Angel and Spike dress up as women to infilterate a dance hall and fool a villain. But at least two people in the group, it was a collaborative writing effort, got really upset about the idea of "Angel" wearing a dress. They felt it demeaned the character somehow or was OTT. We compromised, most of the Spike fans had no problems with Spike wearing a dress. And I agreed to write the Spike in dress sequences along with the two other people.

And...I will always remember a fascinating discussion I had once with my brother and father regarding male writers. My brother despises Cormac McCarthy and Ernest Hemingway, he hates machismo and he's never really been a fan of James Bond. He said...that he feels it's limiting, that men are being pressured into falling into some sort of ideal -- the idea of a macho man, alpha, strong, and sort of cruel. My father, a fan of these writers and characters, was bewildered and felt too many books were geared towards women not men. He also had the odd view that women were more nuturing, caring, natural gardners, caregivers, and domestic, while men were more protective, less good with kids, and more pragmatic. My brother and I sort of threw that theory out the window. Since we are sort of the opposite or a hodge podge of both. We, my brother and I, both strongly believe that gender is immaterial and a spectrum. That it doesn't matter. When I mentioned once to him that women navel gaze more than men and are more into emotion and analyzing it, he blew my theory out of the water by telling one of his male friends did this sort of thing all the frigging time.

I'm talking about all this... because several things, not just one, have happened that brought it to the surface. The book I'm reading at the moment is driving me nuts, it's a fantasy novel and it is so...boilerplate on gender. Reinforcing stereotypes. Makes me miss Captive Prince. One of the reasons a lot of women like male/male romances is that a lot of gender stereotypes get exploded, also you don't have to deal with the ingrained sexism that is in the female/male romances. Did you know that a lot of reviewers on Amazon and Good Reads actually capitalize the word "Hero" and lowercase the word "heroine", with H/h? It blew my mind when I first noticed it. I started responding, please stop this, then gave up.

And of course the election from hell...resulting in the President from hell. I guess you could say the Europeans are more advanced in that respect. Except the Europeans don't elect candidates necessarily so much as parties. And it is the party that elects the candidate. So just that district elected Margaret Thatcher or Theresa May. I wonder if the entire country had to vote for them, if the result would have been the same? (Not sure about Germany.) And to be fair, Hillary did get the popular vote. But it's disconcerting that a lot of people chose to vote for a man who had not one but several allegations of sexual harrassment and sexual violence against him, various civil suits, and said derogatory things about women over a woman who apparently had no clue how to use email. Yet, they tell me they aren't sexist or misogynistic. And they aren't. Not in their day to day pursuits.
So why? Why chose to believe the horror stories about Hillary over Trump? Was it about gender? Hard to say...it appears to be. They say it wasn't. Yet. Same deal with Bernie vs. Hillary. They say it's not, and maybe not, yet...so many of the ads screamed it. Hillary was too masculine, too hard, not friendly enough, didn't wear the right clothing.

And now, the ruckus over Doctor Who. In a perfect world, it wouldn't matter. Doctor Who in a perfect world would have been black, blue, a woman, an man, old, young, and something in between. In a perfect world, it wouldn't matter that Barack Obama is black, or that Hillary is female. But alas, we don't live in a perfect world. We live a flawed one. From an objective pov, such as my mother's or various others...this seems rather silly. Just as getting upset over making James Bond female or casting a female version of Bond might. (Which they did, by the way.) But not as James Bond. Not that they can. James Bond is after all human and he doesn't regenerate. And the movies don't necessarily follow a serialized format. I don't why they couldn't cast a female Bond, anymore than they couldn't cast a female Starbuck or female Wolverine. Or, Spike or Angel female. I'd actually like to see someone reboot Angel the Series but with a gender flip. Less so, Buffy, because been there done that.
(There was a British show a while back about a boy who was chosen to fight monsters...) And to be fair, the whole point of Buffy was to challenge a gender trope. (To give you a little back story on Buffy? Whedon studied film in school, and almost all horror films killed the Buffy character off, she was staked, slayed, and often in an alley. With the guy being the hero. Also up to Buffy, all vampire stories had the girl killed, and they guy be the vampire slayer. In short, we've had 100 years of Buster the Vampire Slayer. Whedon was flipping the trope. If you recast Buffy with a guy, it wouldn't be interesting. Actually that's why Supernatural isn't very interesting ...because been there, done that. It doesn't challenge any established tropes. It doesn't do anything interesting. At the end of the day, it's mindless tv. Which is okay. I like mindless tv. But it's not great. Buffy was great because it changed television. And it did it by challenging established gender tropes and archetypes.)

I think the problem with challenging these tropes in culture is two-fold. One, people have a tendency to watch things with their genitalia or as masturbation fodder. I know, I know, insane, but there it is. They won't admit it. But if someone is posting pictures of a hot character...

Two...there's this thing about archetypes and that's psychological. Role models. Needing a strong male hero to fantasize about or love or look up to. And...whether we want to admit it or not, a need to reinforce traditional views and comforting categories that we were taught.

I don't this is speculation for the most part. Because I like flipping the gender roles. I get off on it. I'm doing it myself to an extent, in my writing. I like subvert established tropes. And it irritates me when artists don't. Like with the book I'm reading now. For me, art is more interesting when they aren't playing it safe. It's hard for me to understand why you want it to be safe?
Or maybe I do...I do watch and read things for comfort. Although they aren't necessarily conventional.

Again, I don't know. I don't know why the guy on my friend's FB page can't handle a female Doctor Who. He's rational is that Who is from his perspective identified as male. That the proof of that is how he loved, that he loved in a heterosexual male way. As if there is such a thing. Maybe there is?
I don't know there was never any sex on Doctor Who. It was implied but rather coyly. My friend was as bewildered by this as I was. He suggested that she'd be upset if Wonder Woman was cast as a male.
But that already happened, with Wonder Man. The US has less problems with this sort of thing in its cultural experiments than the Brits apparently. We do it all the time. So part of my bewilderment may be that I'm used to it. Example? Starbuck.

And I don't know why Hillary couldn't become President. Or why we insist on reinforcing these things.

I don't understand my own views on it. But I think we need to ask the questions. Ask why. I don't think it is something as simple as misogyny or sexism ...I think it is more about how we link gender and identity in our heads, giving gender perhaps more importance then we should? Another way of looking at it...a lot of people I've met online...I've no idea from their names what gender they are. I guess. But I've been wrong. They've guessed about me and been wrong. Although I always thought shadowkat was rather obvious. I remember one individual being pissed that we felt the need to out their gender. They preferred to be genderless online. To be without a gender. I think it was interesting that I felt the need to identify it.
lynnmonster: (Default)
[personal profile] lynnmonster
I came home kind of late tonight.

When I went to grab the metal cat bowls I use for the kittens' wet food, I noticed that the plastic bases they nest in were a bit dirty and picked them up to wash as well.

Inner metal bowls and plastic outer holders get washed. I put down the wet food in the naked metal bowls while the plastic holders dry off in the rack for a while longer.  

While the kittens are still nomming their dinners, I retreat to my bedroom and close the door.

When I come out again for more than a quick bathroom trip, the metal bowls are gone.

Now, when the bowls are not in their bases, they are lightweight and can be nudged around pretty easily. However, I have a very small one bedroom apartment. 

So I check under every piece of furniture in the rooms they had access to. I check behind doors and furniture and anything else. I check between things and on top of things. I check under the throw pillows on the couch, even though that's ridiculous.

I check the trash, the recycling bag, the sink, the stovetop, and inside the fridge, just in case I wandered around on autopilot and put them somewhere without thinking about it. (I really, really didn't, but I check on the off chance that I am actually losing my mind.) 

People, these bowls are GONE.

What the hell???

________________

7/19 ETA:  Mystery solved -- hiding in plain sight! 
 
They wound up INSIDE the identical metal bowls for their dry food (which don't move around as much since they were properly nested in their outer plastic holders). 
 
Still no idea whether they were put there by me or the cats.
 


Wed Reading Meme and other things..

Jul. 19th, 2017 07:33 pm
shadowkat: (work/reading)
[personal profile] shadowkat
More other things...

1. A friend of mine on her FB page is having multiple heated discussions with various Doctor Who fans about well, a female Doctor Who. She's for it, of course, they aren't. Her discussions are reminiscent of the debates she had regarding Hillary and Trump.

She's a great debater. But people are...stubborn. Her best point was this Original Creator told BBC to cast Woman as Doctor in 1986.

Here's a link to an interesting article in The Mary Sue about negative female reactions to Doctor Who. And how ingrained misogyny is in our culture. I know it is, I've read a lot of romance novels and literary novels by female writers...and oh dear. Also, notably, I know a lot of men who are happy with Doctor Who being a Woman, voted for Hillary, and loved Wonder Woman, and a lot of women who need well a strong male lead and can't handle powerful women. I saw it in the Buffy fandom, Doctor Who fandom in regards to River Song, and Battle Star Galatica fandom in regards to Starbuck.

2. What I just finished reading?

King's Rising - The Captive Prince Part III and The Summer Palace by CS Pascat. Both were okay. Kings Rising was better. Summer Palace sort of works as a fanservice epilogue. Lots of boring sex, not a lot of story. I'd skip Summer Palace and just end with King's Rising.


What I'm reading now?

Lord of the Fading Lands by CL Wilson -- hmmm, apparently I'm on an initial kick.

This is fantasy, told in a fairy-tale style, with a romance at the center of it, at least for the first two books. The later three in the series apparently focus more on the battles and conflict apparently.

Not sure I'll make it that far. The writing style is not exactly captivating me. I'm having issues with how the writer perceives gender. Also she's very conventional, as is her story. It follows the established tropes.

That said, she says some interesting things about our culture, via fantasy, and is an excellent world-builder. From a thematic, world-building, and plot perspective, she's pretty good, somewhere in line with CS Lewis. And her style is in some respects similar to Anne McCaffrey. (I don't like Anne McCaffrey's writing style now, which is odd. I recently tried to re-read her Dragon Rider's of Pern series and gave up mid-way through. I have a feeling that I'd react the same way to CS Lewis. I loved both as a child, but now certain aspects of their writing and how they viewed gender, get on my nerves.)

I'm admittedly a little obsessed with gender issues at the moment. There's a reason for that -- points at current President, and last year's election.

3. Claws

Made it through five episodes of this series on "On Demand". (Adam Ruins the World -- almost ruined the episodes. He kept popping up in the commercial breaks -- which is every fifteen minutes for On Demand. And I kept muting him, because I cannot abide that man's voice. It's the human equivalent of nails on chalk board. Seriously, people, watch Bill Nye Science Guy instead of Adam. His show is on TruTV. The US has more television networks than it requires. I don't know, I think 1000 is a bit much, don't you?) BTW, the later episodes (of CLAWS not Adam) are really good. You sort of have to get past the introductory stuff...or I did. Actually this is true of most television shows. I rarely get hooked with the first episode. And when I do, the show tends to lose me after the third one.

I loved the fifth episode. Although, I feel a little guilty for loving it. It's hilarious in places.
There's this scene where ...you sort of have to see it for yourself. Too hard to explain. Oh and a great dance sequence to Lady Marmalade.

It also has a lovely twist, that had me giggling.

The series reminds me a lot of Breaking Bad -- except with a John Waters flair.

4. Struggling with a lot of things at the moment. I think I may have to go off fruit. Broke out in hives after having a dish of berries, truwhip cream and a little ice cream. Had the same thing last night, no issues. Not sure why I had a reaction tonight.

Super promises he'll paint the living room soon. Just hasn't happened yet. I'm waiting for it to get painted prior to doing anything else with it. I want a table so I can paint. I miss painting. I watercolor, not oil paint or not with acrylics. Although I have painted with acrylics in the past. Taught myself in my twenties. Just have had more watercolor courses and I'm more comfortable with the medium.

Considering taking another class -- but it meets on the upper East Side, and is at 6PM after work, and I just don't know if I can get there in time and if it's doable.

At loose ends. Want to do something, just not sure what. I want to paint, but do I really want to take a class? I need a table. I can't paint on my lap or the floor effectively. And I tend to spill things, so... Also, I have a bad back.

Also struggling with my novel. I don't really know why.

fountain pen sale

Jul. 19th, 2017 03:31 pm
yhlee: wax seal (hxx Deuce of Gears)
[personal profile] yhlee
The time has come to find new homes for some of the vintage fountain pens in my collection.

These are all great pens, but the truth is I have a fair number of great pens and these are ones that simply aren't making it into my rotation. I'd rather someone else get some enjoyment out of them!

All prices include shipping within the continental USA. Elsewhere, please inquire--I will probably have to charge you shipping at cost. I accept payment via Paypal.

If interested, either leave a comment or email me (yoon at yoonhalee dot com).





From left to right:

1. Wahl-Eversharp Doric in Kashmir (a sort of dark swirly marbled green). Lever filler. The great thing about this pen is that it has a #3 adjustable nib. It goes from Fine to Broad on the flexiest setting. The only reason I'm letting this go is that I have a Wahl-Eversharp Doric in black with a #7 adjustable nib, and I honestly don't need two adjustable Dorics.

Please note that the #3 Doric is a petite pen--unless you have very small hands, you will probably want to use this posted.

Price: $225. SOLD

NOTE: [personal profile] troisroyaumes gets first call on this one. If she doesn't want it, then someone else can have it!

2. Waterman Lady Patricia that I bought from Mauricio Aguilar of Vintage Fountain Pens. He graded it a superflex, and it's a pleasurable and absolutely reliable writer; I've always had great experiences with the pens I've bought from Mauricio. Lever filler. Again, this is a lovely pen that I simply don't use--in this case because I'm busy using a different pen that I bought from Mauricio, a Waterman 52V (for which Jedao's Patterner 52 was named :p). Like the #3 Doric, this is a petite pen, and probably best used posted unless you have very small hands.

This is a handsome pen with green and brown swirls, and I love looking at it, but I really prefer for all my pens to be working pens that get used. Maybe you can have fun with it!

Price: $410.

3. Conklin Crescent Filler--the crescent filling mechanism is not that different from lever filling and is very simple to use, and really neat if you love geeking out about different filling mechanisms. This is a wet noodle that does hairlines, if you're into flex writing or copperplate; I probably wouldn't recommend it for sketching because of the fineness of the nib, but it would make a great fountain pen for non-sketch-speed line art.

Price: $320.

4. Osmia 34 in gray candy. This is a very flexy nib that goes from Fine to Broad, and unusually, it's in a piston filler. Please note that the material is discolored along about half the barrel (ambering)--this doesn't affect the pen's functionality, although if you care more about aesthetics this is not the pen for you. This nib has an almost painterly feel to it that is very pleasurable for writing.

Price: $240. [Going to [personal profile] rushthatspeaks for a trial run!]

5. The last two are a Sheaffer Balance in Marine Green, fountain pen and mechanical pencil set. The fountain pen is a lever filler and has a flex nib; I'm not sure what width graphite the pencil takes, although it comes loaded with one. The set is very handsome; please note that the fountain pen has a chip near the lever. This doesn't affect function but may be an aesthetic concern.

Price: $210.

NOTE: [personal profile] troisroyaumes gets first call on this one. If she doesn't want it, then someone else can have it! (She decided to get the Wahl-Eversharp Doric instead, so this pen and pencil set is available!)

Chicks Dig Gaming

Jul. 19th, 2017 12:25 pm
yhlee: Avatar: The Last Airbender: "fight like a girl" (A:tLA fight like a girl)
[personal profile] yhlee
Chicks Dig Gaming, ed. Jennifer Brozek, Robert Smith? [this appears to be part of the author name, as it's listed with the interrogation point in multiple places], and Lars Pearson is one of the books I picked up at Pandemonium Books & Games in Boston. It's an absolutely delightful collection of essays about gaming by women, ranging the gamut from board games to video games to one anthropologist non-gamer who decided to play Portal to study the phenomenon of gaming and explore her reasons for not being a gamer. :p

A few of the essays didn't speak to me personally, but that's fine--for example, there was one about adventure games through the lens of the Monkey Island games, which I did play, but I didn't imprint on the genre. It's not that it was a bad essay, but rather that it was a type of gaming experience I just wasn't as interested in. And that's fine; for some other reader that could be entirely their thing.

Here's a rundown:

cut for length )

To sum up: highly recommended.

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